Notting Hill

Renting property in Notting Hill, W11

Residential Land has hundreds of flats in London to rent. If you are looking to rent property in Notting Hill, W11, please contact us here.

Why rent in Notting Hill?

In west London and falling within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Notting Hill occupies the W11 postcode. The area is most well known for two things: the Portobello Market, on Portobello Road, which runs every day except Sunday; and the Notting Hill carnival, held every year on the last weekend in August.

Notting Hill has a reputation as an affluent and fashionable area known for attractive Victorian town house terraced properties and high-class shopping and restaurants.

Property in Notting Hill

Property prices in Notting Hill have matched the level of investment that has been put into the area's regeneration programme over the past decade and have spiraled rapidly. The combination of vibrant main streets and quiet residential areas, as well as the diverse range of shops, restaurants, bars and other sources of entertainment, have all lead to this part of London becoming a very popular place to live.

Renting property in Notting Hill is an ideal solution for many people looking to rent in London. There is such a wide variety of properties available in Notting Hill including modern new-build apartments like Residential Land's Portobello Lofts and Portobello Apartments, flats in converted Victorian buildings such as Lancaster Gate and Bathurst Street, and grand stucco fronted houses such as Garden House, Grand Plaza, Paddington Green and Bathurst Street which back onto popular garden squares such as Kensington Park Gardens, St John's Gardens and Ladbroke Square, that there is something for everyone here.

Properties in this highly desirable area command equally high prices, attracting media types, but the area does offer easy access to green spaces, boutique shops and the rest of London.

Transport links in Notting Hill

The Notting Hill area benefits from excellent transport links including Notting Hill Gate underground station which is served by the District, Circle and Central lines, Latimer Road tube station on the Hammersmith and City line, and Ladbroke Grove tube station also served by the Hammersmith and City line. The closest overland mainline railway station to Notting Hill is Paddington.

Motorists also benefit from rapid routes to the west of the country and Heathrow Airport via the M4.

History of Notting Hill

In the 19th century, modern Notting Hill began to emerge in west London as a neighbourhood in its own right. During this period, the area became known as a hub for craftsmanship, with a large brick making industry which built up due to the large clay deposits in the soil in the area, Notting Hill helped to fuel the development in central London. While the central parts of the city developed extensively during the Industrial Revolution, Notting Hill retained its rural culture well into the era.

Having avoided development so far, it was during the middle of the 19th century that things began to change. Large land holding families, such as the Ladbrokes, moved into the area and began to develop residential and commercial real estate in Notting Hill, and the Kensington Park area emerged as the central hub in the city. Today, the unique architecture and colours in Notting Hill can be traced to this era, which marked the emergence of the modern commercial and arts culture surrounding Portobello Road.

Notting Hill became home to a large number of Afro-Caribbean immigrants, and racial tension often arose in the area. Britain's first race riots occurred in Notting Hill in August 1958. However, the following year the Notting Hill Carnival emerged as an unofficial reply to the riots and by 1965 it took to the streets and has grown ever since. Its presence in the last weekend of August sees around one million people joining the party, backing up the claim that it is the world's biggest street festival outside of Rio. Aside from carnival weekend, Notting Hill is a rather quiet area for most of the year. The exception to this is Saturdays when Portobello Market is jam-packed with visitors hunting through the antiques market.

The area came to international attention with the release of the successful Hollywood movie of the same name. Notting Hill (1999) stars Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant. The movie uses the characteristic features of the area as a backdrop to the action, including the Portobello Road antiques market and enclosed square gardens.

Attractions in Notting Hill

Notting Hill Carnival

The famous Notting Hill celebrations were started by West Indian immigrants in the mid-1950s and have taken place annually ever since.

The Notting Hill Carnival still bears the strong Caribbean flavour of its origins with steel drums, calypso and soca music ringing through the streets as well as extravagant costumes, floats and dancing. To many, the Notting Hill Carnival is not only an established London tradition, it is a symbol of London's multi-cultural status.

Portobello Road

Portobello Road is undoubtedly one of London's most famous shopping streets. Iconic because of the brightly coloured shop fronts that were immortalised in the British film "Notting Hill", the street offers an eclectic mix of shops, boutiques, galleries, bars and restaurants that is unparalleled outside of central London. There is a definite bias towards fashion and artistic shops on the street with everything and everyone exuding charisma, style and charm.

Holland Park

Hidden in an upmarket residential area, Holland Park originally belonged to the now almost completely destroyed Holland House. Within the park you will find a lake, beautifully kept gardens, woodland and Japanese gardens, plus children's playgrounds and during the summer months an open-air theatre.

Coronet Cinema

Situated on the corner of Notting Hill Gate, close to Notting Hill Gate tube station, The Coronet Cinema is an institution. For decades it has been one of the capital's most prestigious independent cinemas showing an eclectic range of films from Hollywood blockbusters to lesser known world cinema productions and locally produced films. Although maintaining its old fashioned design, the cinema is comfortable and still has a large screen.

The Museum of Brands Packaging and Advertising

Featuring over 12,000 original items from the Robert Opie Collection, the Museum of Brands Packaging and Advertising is a recent addition to the museums in London, located just off the famous Portobello Road in Notting Hill. The history of consumer culture is revealed through household products and shopping basket favourites in the "time tunnel", which charts a nostalgic journey from Victorian times to the present day. Discover how well-loved brands evolved through their creative use of packaging and advertising, and how we evolved with them.

Shopping in Notting Hill

Portobello Market

You will find Portobello Market every Saturday sandwiched between Kensington High Street and Portobello Road. It offers some of the best shopping in London and it attracts people from all over the world. Although there are some covered areas, Portobello Market is an open air market featuring everything from expensive furniture to home made doilies. The diverse range of goods available comes from the more than 1200 dealers who set up stalls here every weekend. If the shopping is not enough entertainment, street musicians play for change and clowns and other performance artists are not an uncommon site.

Portobello Road is also known for having the largest antiques market in the world. An amazing spectacle, the market lines well over a mile of the street stretching from Notting Hill Gate to Ladbroke Grove. The market has gained a worldwide reputation due of its size and the quality of the vendors who trade there.

Shopping in Notting Hill is not all about the markets. Between Notting Hill Gate tube station and Kensington, you will also find a range of shops selling book, clothes, music, flowers and accessories.

The Travel Bookshop

Made famous by featuring in the 1999 movie "Notting Hill", this bookshop still operates as such offering a great range of books, informative staff and a serenely quiet atmosphere where you are able to sit and read without being peered at or pounced on.

Planet Organic

The UK's largest fully certified organic supermarket, this Planet Organic stocks ordinary groceries as well as meat and fresh fish.

Restaurants in Notting Hill

There are countless places to eat in Notting Hill from the affordable to the exclusive.

The Electric Bar and Brasserie

Very popular with those living in Notting Hill, The Electric Bar and Brasserie on Portobello Road serves a cosmopolitan menu.

Black and Blue

Kensington Church Street's Black and Blue offers a mouth watering selection of steaks. Although they do also offer dishes for vegetarians, this restaurant is primarily adored by meat eaters.

Clarkes

Quoted as being one of Jamie Olivers favourite restaurants, Clarkes specialises in using seasonal and organic ingredients wherever possible, and with its own bakery next door selling fresh bread, cakes, deli items and seasonal produce you are guaranteed the freshest food available.

Essenza

Notting Hill's Essenza serves simple but tasty seasonal Italian dishes and is one of the most buzzing Italian restaurants in London.

E and O

E and O restaurant in the heart of Notting Hill is a busy place offering exquisite Asian cuisine and an impressive Dim Sum menu as well as an extensive wine and cocktail list.